Category Archives: IR Theory

#RubySeries List for #ISA2015

Following Cynthia Weber’s recent post over at Duck of Minerva, there has been a lot of debate about the International Studies Association’s planned ‘Saphire Series’ for the upcoming annual conference in New Orleans. Some of that debate has been taking place at the #occupyirtheory/ipe Facebook group. With now over 175 comments, there have been a wide ranging set of proposals and ideas about the issues raised by the Series, and how to respond to them. Many will be using the #Ruby hashtag on Twitter to maintain communications on these issues as the conference proceeds. Another idea has been for people to list any panels they feel might offer the possibility of institutionally balancing the dominant ‘white, male and tenured’ voices the Series is showcasing. Interested readers can also follow the Twitter hashtag #RubySeries for updates on these panels.

Disclaimer: this list is based on suggestions made in context of an open and ongoing discussion at the OccupyIR group on Facebook, among other places, about ISA’s Sapphire Series. It is not intended as a way of ‘promoting’ select panels. It is merely a way for people to link their panels together in an expression of solidarity in response to the perceived elitism of the Sapphire series. If you are part of a panel that you do want listed, let me know. Similarly, if you do not want your panel listed, I am happy to remove it for you.

Ruby Series: Celebrating Multiple Voices in Conversation

Current as of  02/17/15 — 71 Panels!

Wednesday

  1. WA10: Presidential Theme Panel: Advancing Global IR (I): Challenges And Prospects
  2. WA11: Rethinking Silence, Voice and Agency in Feminist Approaches to Security
  3. WA21: Local Actors and the Diffusion of Gender Norms in Developing Regions
  4. WA41: Decolonizing Methods: New Tools for Global IR
  5. WA52: Anti-Colonial Poetics and the Lived Experience of Politics
  6. WA 56: Presidential Theme Panel – Indigenous Peoples, Values And Sovereignty, In The Study Of Global Politics
  7. WB30: Presidential Theme Panel: Bandung+60: Legacies and Contradictions
  8. WB31: Postcolonialism, Feminism And Global International Relations: Remembering The Legacy Of Geeta Chowdhry
  9. WB78: Women’s Activism in Revolutions and Crises
  10. WC18: Embodiment, Experience and War: Methodological Challenges and Reflections
  11. WC19: Do We Know Gender in Peacebuilding? (I) Gender Mainstreaming and UNSCR 1325
  12. WC40: Girls, Gender and the Post-2015 Global Development Agenda
  13. WC60: Women in Conflict: Perspectives
  14. WD02: FTGS Eminent Scholar Panel Honoring Shirin M. Rai
  15. WD08: New Thinking on Religions and Civilizations in World Politics
  16. WD52: Representation and Practice: Bodies, Borders and Orders of Security
  17. WD58: Living Globalisation: Female Academics at Home and Abroad

Thursday

  1. TA10: What’s Wrong with a Singular World?
  2. TA11: Gendering International Organisations
  3. TA 22: Race And International Relaons: A Debate Around John Hobson’s “The Eurocentric Conception Of World Politics”
  4. TA30: Borders and Belonging: Gender, Nation, Ethnicity in Transnational Relations
  5. TA29: roundtable on “(Everyday) Sexism in the Academy: Stories & Strategies”
  6. TA38: roundtable: Does Russell Brand Have A Point, Or Does Being Cheeky Count As Revolution?
  7. TA50: The End of Militarized Masculinity? Global Perspectives on Gender and Traveling Concepts
  8. TA51: Is the Personal-National Globally Political? Theorizing the International Diffusion of LGBTQ Rights
  9. TA69 Claiming a Voice: Politics in a World of Inequality.
  10. TB30 Presidential Theme Panel – Feminist International Relations Today: A Discipline Transformed?
  11. TB50: Global Feminist IR
  12. TC02 Race and Racism in International Relations
  13. TC06: Presidential Theme Panel – How The Search For ‘Non-Western IR’ Led To A Reflection Of The ‘Self’: (Un)Learning IR In And Beyond The Classroom
  14. TC07: Globalizing International Studies Pedagogies
  15. TC16: Gender and Human Rights, 1:45pm
  16. TC21: Art as Subject, Art as Method
  17. TC56: Decolonial Methodologies: Critiques and Experiences from the Fieldwork
  18. TC72: Critical Friends and De(Con)Structure Critics: How Should Feminist Academics Engage with Global Institutions?
  19. TD09: IR’s Eurocentric Limitations TD21: roundtable on “After Deepwater Horizon: Rebuilding Indigenous Communities After the BP Gulf Oil Disaster”
  20. TD14: Colonial Legacies and Decolonizing Trajectories
  21. TD33: Making Sense of Emotions, Politics and War
  22. TD52: Global Human Trafficking and Gender
  23. TD57: Global Masculinities in a Transnational World

Friday

  1. FA13: Conceptualising the Use of Sexual Violence and Rape in War
  2. FA22: Do Something: Activism, Responsibility and the Politics of ‘Helping’
  3. FA47: Gendering the Global Political Economy
  4. FB10: Presidential Theme Panel: Decolonizing the Western Academy: Postcolonial Challenges to Global IR
  5. FB27: LGBT Issues and Diffusion
  6. FB34: Queering/Querying Global Political Economy
  7. FC01: Angela Davis honored as IPE section’s 2015 Outstanding Activist Scholar in New Orleans. (co-chaired by J. Ann Tickner and Hasmet M. Uluorta. More information will be coming shortly. If you have any questions please contact Hasmet — huluorta@trentu.ca )
  8. FC19: Deconstructing Silence and Agency in Sites of Insecurity
  9. FC26: Political Engagement and Political Alternatives in The Age of Austerity In Europe
  10. FC27: Queering Global Politics: Destabilization or Disciplinarity
  11. FC39 Presidential Theme Panel: Three Decades of Worlding IR: A roundtable Retrospective
  12. FC55: Addressing Gender-Based Violence: Issues and Responses
  13. FC57: Presidential Theme Panel “Postcolonialism, Race And IR: War, Capitalism, Segregation, Tribes, Literature”
  14. FC72: Women in Conflict: Agency and Human Security
  15. FC74: Sex Gender Violence Desire?
  16. FD36: Queering IR Theory
  17. FD37 Presidential Theme Panel/Global Development Distinguished Scholar Panel in Honors of Prof. Pal Ahluwalia
  18. FD56: Presidential Theme Panel – W.E.B. Du Bois: The Global Color Line And North American IR
  19. FD57: Making Bodies International
  20. FD59: Gender-Based Violence in ‘War’ and ‘Peace’

Saturday

  1. SA07: Regional Institution Building In Comparative Perspective
  2. SA25: The Global Dead (II): Mourning, Suffering, Witnessing
  3. SA31: Economic Development and Women’s (Dis)Empowerment
  4. SA41: Art Matters: On the Aesthetics of Violence, Death and Memory
  5. SA61: Queer Theory and the International
  6. SA72: International Relations as the Crossroads of the Global and the Local
  7. SB17: Beyond Biopolitics and Risk in Post 9/11 Critical Scholarship: The Affective Politics of the War on Terror and Beyond
  8. SB47: Masculinities, Militarism and Feminist Security Studies
  9. SB43: Bodies In/And/Of/For Global Health
  10. SB54: Sexualised Violence, Surveillance and New Security Technologies
  11. SB57: Presidential Theme Panel – 34 Ways To Say “International Relations”: The Teaching, Research And Interna

CFP – Global Crises / Capitalist Expressions: Critical Connections

***CFP for a panel***

Title: Global Crises / Capitalist Expressions: Critical Connections

Where: EISA 9th Pan-European Conference, Sicily, 23-26 September 2015

Abstract: What are the ways that relations of global capitalism can be made intelligible through analyses of various “crises”? This panel seeks to develop the analysis of contemporary capital by way of capturing its expressions, or effects, in a range of contemporary global crises (economic, environmental, epidemic, colonial, militaristic, etc.). We hope to highlight different iterations of global capitalism through its intrinsic tendency to crisis, and by doing so, to underscore the possibilities of a variety approaches to the critique of capitalism. Thus, we invite papers addressing a breadth of potential sites and scenes of contemporary capitalism’s globality, from those involving more immediately situated struggles over the limits it places on everyday material existence to more widely-scaled analyses, focusing on the governmental and governmentalizing dynamics of globalization itself. Gathering these various approaches together, this panel will be an opportunity to explore the stakes of global capitalist discourse and practice as it advances norms of market-based existence, individual responsibility, flexible partnership and resilience, all the while beset by the aporias of uneven development, financialization, war profiteering, corporate welfare, and the reckless extraction and consumption of resources.

For more info, contact Nicholas Kiersey (at the address on this website) or Garnet Kindervater. Submissions no later than Monday, September 29, please.

Struggling with Precarity: From More and Better Jobs to Less and Lesser Work | The Disorder Of Things

From Wanda Vrasti, does the language of precarity empower us? Or can we do better?

But what if precarity was the wrong rallying point to focus on? What if instead of describing a shared experience all that the concept did was point to the absence of a common ground? Is there any way we could turn precarity around from a testament to our shared vulnerability into a positive affirmation of collective desire?

via Struggling with Precarity: From More and Better Jobs to Less and Lesser Work | The Disorder Of Things.

So, this just happened…

Swoon...
Swoon…

So this is definitely one of the more cool things to happen in my life…

 

Live at the #ISA2013 Weblog Awards!

These are not duckies!

20130404-193931.jpg

Michael Hardt, ‘The Right to the Common’ – A Response

What, if anything, unifies the expressions of public protest that ‘kicked off everywhere’ in 2010-11, from Dataran to Tunis to Zuccotti Park? If such a unity exists, to what extent are those engaged in the struggles self-consciously aware of it? And, if such a self-consciousness exists, to what extent does it help further the cause of social justice in a world beset by financial crisis and elite corruption? In his talk at Ohio University’s campus in Athens, last week, Michael Hardt argued that the main stake in this most recent “cycle of struggles” was the pursuit of a sort of ‘right to the common.’ While those in the movements were engaged in struggles that were spatially and temporally specific, he suggested, they were unified by a desire to resolve a contradiction that has become increasingly apparent in the context of the current financial crisis. That contradiction inheres in the fact that the main ideological wellsprings for resolving the crisis have essentially run dry. The flaws of neoliberalism, on the one hand, or the idea that the optimal distributive solutions are to be found through a doubling-down on the rationalizing logic of the market, are by now well-known. Conversely, on the other, the notion that a philosophy of ‘public goods’ can somehow guarantee “shared open access” to the common, a notion which Hardt understands in quite an expansive sense, is increasingly suspect given the draconian statist policies such a position can sometimes underwrite. Hardt’s thesis then, briefly stated, is that the commitment of the movements to a form of organization and decision-making that is essentially horizontal (my term, not his) in nature attests to a sort of emerging awareness of the need for an alternative to these ‘zombie’ ideologies. This spirit of horizontalism, he appeared to say, distinguishes the movements as engaged in a kind of “double combat.” That is, in their efforts to engage in a kind of radically democratic form of allocative management – an attempt beset by flaws to be sure, but a meaningful attempt nevertheless – horizontalism appears to adopt the following posture: “We win the public, but then we have to fight it for the common.”

Continue reading Michael Hardt, ‘The Right to the Common’ – A Response

My Review of Zanotti: ‘Governing Disorder’ – H-Net Reviews

My review of Laura Zanotti’s Governing Disorder: UN Peace Operations, International Security, and Democratization in the Post-Cold War Era has been published over at H-Net Reviews. As I note, the book constitutes a refreshing attempt to break with the recent ‘life determinism’ tendency among critical Security Studies types. As I conclude, however, the book moves perhaps a little too quickly in dismissing the explanatory potential of Marxism:

Situating the UN’s bio-narrative in discourses of liberal securitization, as merely a technical means to a moral end, seems to play down the extent to which that moral end might actually be imagined in fairly economic terms. Marxism is a helpful guide, says Zanotti, to the extent that it can explore questions of uneven development as a condition which peacebuilding must then encounter. Yet Hardt and Negri’s Empire (2000) is subjected to a very casual dismissal for its “structural/dialectical conceptualization of history” (p. 4). This kind of shoehorning is unfortunate given both that Hardt and Negri have sought repeatedly to distinguish themselves from such reductionist thinking and that their work at the very least broaches the possibility that the events with which Zanotti’s book is concerned might also be inflected by economic imperatives and rationalities.

Battlestar Galactica & International Relations


Battlestar Galactica & International Relations

Battlestar Galactica and International Relations (Hardback) – Routledge.

Just a brief note to let you know the book I co-edited with Iver Neumann, Battlestar Galactica & International Relations, is now available. You can buy it on Amazon in hardback and Kindle formats here. A cheaper, paperback version of the book will be coming later this year. This project has been over two years in the making, and started with a random encounter at the bar at an ISA convention in New York. As the convention was taking place, the cast and crew of the show were addressing the United Nations, just up the road, on the plight of child soldiers! We were pretty blown away by the idea that such an encounter was even possible. And we got talking… well, what WAS “BSG’s” political message, anyway? At the following year’s ISA in New Orleans, we held a panel wherein we discussed some ideas about the show and noticed that, well, some IR folk were *serious* fans of the show:

bsg panel

Continue reading Battlestar Galactica & International Relations

Panel CFP, ISA 2013: “It’s kicking off… everywhere? Diffusion, resistance and the post-political”

3 – 6 April 2013
ISA San Francisco

#Provisional title
It’s kicking off… everywhere? Diffusion, resistance and the post-political.

#Call for panel participants
With the global financial crisis now in its fourth year, a host of horizontally-organised antagonisms from the Indignad@s to #OccupyDataran have emerged to challenge the traditional institutions of world order. It is perhaps no wonder that scholars and commentators are debating the extent to which it is necessary or appropriate to identify lines of similarity and commonality among these struggles. Neither is it surprising that some may express reservations concerning these emerging analyses as risking the subsumption and universalization of that which might best be approached as singular. Yet these debates emerge simultaneous to events and uprisings, and the strategies and tactics of current struggles are still very much in development. In response to the ISA CfP, the panel will ask, indeed, how desirable is specificity and congruity in the diffusion of ideas? Who specifically are the agents involved in such movements, and what causal mechanisms carry out, as well as block diffusion? Furthermore, what are the predicted outcomes of the diffusion of ideas, energies, emotions, and desires emerging from the Occupy movement?

The ongoing rise of social struggle predicted by the Social Unrest Index in the International Labour Organisation’s 2012 World of Work Report means that governments have strong incentives to depoliticise issues of rapidly rising unemployment, austerity measures and cuts in public spending, pressures on immigration law, and the rise in punitive government sanctions and policing. How are specific strategies of depoliticisation emerging, and how can these be revealed as obstacles to diffusion amongst resistance movements? This panel, avoiding theoretical or disciplinary boundaries, will seek to examine recent movements in light of global pressures and the philosophical challenges arising from them. What exactly changed to bring forth new energies? To what degree can background conditions and experiences be claimed to be shared? To what extent have recent social movements sacrificed transformative potential, for inclusivity? Indeed, in a world where the sphere of political participation looks increasingly bulimic, to what extent does the strategic refusal of the movements (as yet) to pose themselves as a constituted or final subjectivity, represent a remedy or a hindrance in the increasingly formidable project of global democratic renewal?

The organizers of this panel wish to invite proposals for papers on any of the above questions or related themes.

#Submissions
Please submit a 200/250 word abstract to Nicholas Kiersey <kiersey@ohio.edu> and Phoebe Moore <P.Moore@salford.ac.uk> no later than Thursday, May 24. Should we receive a strong number of proposals, we will be happy to coordinate splitting the submissions over a number of panels.

#Dissemination
Please note that this CfP is being issued in the context of recent events and critical discussions associated with the #occupyirtheory movement, and in anticipation of further such discussions at ISA-BISA in Edinburgh and the Millennium Conference in London later this year. As such, our goal would be to evolve this proposal into a book length volume entitled (provisionally) ‘Occupy World Politics’.

Occupyirtheory ISA2012 Lineup, & Poster! [UPDATED]

#occupyirtheory at #ISA2012

Just a reminder! Don’t forget to join us for the #occupyirtheory session at ISA 2012 in San Diego, Tuesday April 3 (Room 204 Hilton Bayfront Hotel). The event will feature a brief roundtable-style discussion followed by a ‘General Assembly’-style open forum to talk about what the IR and IPE communities want from Occupy Wall Street, and what Occupy can expect from us. Confirmed speakers at the roundtable event at this time include: Pablo K, Robbie Shilliam, Luke Ashworth, and Nicholas Kiersey. Wanda Vrasti will facilitate the GA and introduce the procedural format for those as yet unfamiliar with how it all works. Really looking forward to seeing you there!

Also, a very special thanks to Pablo K for putting together this absolutely brilliant poster for the event!

[Update: this event, and this blog, actually got a mention in the New York Times! See here].